Our Commitment to Action

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Following the death of George Floyd, Edmonton City Council held public hearings to better understand how Edmontonians viewed police-community relationships. The response at the hearings highlighted the tenuous nature of police-community relationships in Edmonton, and that a segment of the Edmonton population has historically not felt seen, heard or protected by police. Overall the need for an equitable, restorative and on-going approach came to the forefront.

“Commitment to Action” is the Edmonton Police Service's plan to move forward. We are creating space for extensive engagement with communities - communities we haven’t always heard from or or truly listened to. At the same time we are creating space to listen, we also want to start working with the community to action and implement the necessary changes we hear are required. This is not simply just another consultation or listening campaign, we want to move into action and change immediately. That is our commitment.

Following the death of George Floyd, Edmonton City Council held public hearings to better understand how Edmontonians viewed police-community relationships. The response at the hearings highlighted the tenuous nature of police-community relationships in Edmonton, and that a segment of the Edmonton population has historically not felt seen, heard or protected by police. Overall the need for an equitable, restorative and on-going approach came to the forefront.

“Commitment to Action” is the Edmonton Police Service's plan to move forward. We are creating space for extensive engagement with communities - communities we haven’t always heard from or or truly listened to. At the same time we are creating space to listen, we also want to start working with the community to action and implement the necessary changes we hear are required. This is not simply just another consultation or listening campaign, we want to move into action and change immediately. That is our commitment.

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    I just registered - I did not have to answer my gender, but I HAD to answer my ethnicity - why?

    gerry_b asked 6 months ago

    Hi @gerry_b , Thank you for registering and taking the time to ask a question. All of the demographic questions should have been optional, we don't require them in order to engage or participate on this website. We're sorry it wasn't working that way when you registered, I've made sure it is now. 

    We ask to collect demographic data in order to better understand who we are engaging and who might be missing from the conversation. We are committed to hearing the perspectives of diverse communities who call Edmonton home. 

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    When will EPS press charges against those who protest in direct defiance of public orders. They are a danger to our community and living near the legislature has me worried for my health and safety.

    Corban Jude asked 7 months ago

    Hi @CorbanJude, Thank you for your question.  The Edmonton Police Service continues to monitor and respond accordingly to rallies and protests that come to our attention. The EPS works with other agencies to seek out the best information possible for pending events. Decision-making regarding enforcement is dependent on many factors. Specifically, for the Provincial Health Orders, the EPS has maintained a mission of education to compliance. Ticketing or detention is an option and is exercised as deemed necessary. 

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    Hi I was recently given an offer to buy bike. In a 7-11 parking lot. I walked away without reply. But later I thought I should have taken a picture of bike and serial number and got contact info and than check with police to see if it was stolen property. But than I thought “is it even legal to buy something from random people in a parking lot?”. Really want a bike but they are hard to find.

    Joe asked 6 months ago

    Hi Joe, we asked a constable that works in this space and here is his reply: 

     It is not illegal to purchase second-hand items from people.  What could get you in trouble is buying something second hand when you suspect it is stolen.  When you do this, it is called “willful blindness”.  In essence, you are purchasing something knowing there is a good potential it is stolen.  A good example of this is if someone walked up to you with a trench coat and tried to sell you a Rolex for $50.  Or someone drives up to you at a gas station and tries to sell you’re a stereo out of the back of their van.  The items being sold are clearly priced way below their normal price point and the situation they are being sold in seems very suspicious.  Most people would think that that property is most likely stolen, so going ahead with the purchase should not be done as you could be charged with Possession of Stolen Property.  

    The same goes for purchasing items online.  As an example, A police officer has received information that someone is in possession of a stolen bicycle.  They go to the person’s residence and the person states they purchased it online from someone.  The bike was purchased way under the value of the bike.  The bike was listed as stolen, so it was returned to the actual owner of the bike. The purchaser was out hundreds of dollars for the bike because they did not use due diligence in purchasing the bike.  No charge was laid in this instance given the totally of the circumstances but defiantly a expensive lesson to learn.

    In your situation,  what you could have done is report it to the police.  If something seems fishy or suspicious you can report this.  People that sell stolen items sometime attempt to rob a person when they pull out their money- so there is a risk in engaging. For bikes specifically you can look them up on CPIC  or  the Bike Index .  Be aware though, if the owner has not reported it stolen, and later does, you are out that money.  Police do not compensate you for purchasing stolen property.  With any second-hand purchases buyers should always beware what they are buying.

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    Hello Chief of Police Edmonton. Can you please explain to me why the traffic lasered police are zealously enforcing the playground zones when we're under a cold weather warning and there isn't a person near or around a playground right now? When it's a major artery road to the Millbourn Mall first of all it was previously a 50 km zone which made sense. Now with these blanket policies regarding 30 km near a playground which are surrounded by 5 ft. High chain link fence, makes no common sense at all. Being penalized for doing 49 km on a major artery hardly seems justifiable considering the circumstances. Why is it that you can drive by soccer fields and playgrounds on 23 Avenue Millwoods with no fencing by the road and the speed limit is 60 km? These ridiculous blanket policies which were made up by misinformed uneducated leaders should be reexamined. Upset? You bet I am, I can't afford a $170 ticket going to see my Doctor by overzealous police enforcement.

    Gilles Roy asked 7 months ago

    Hi Gilles, Thanks for messaging us. I can imagine how frustrating it is to receive a speeding ticket that you feel is unfair. Especially when similar looking neighborhoods have different limits or rules. Although EPS enforces speed limits, they are actually set by city council. A lot of speed enforcement is targeted as a result of complaints about speed your speed enforcement may or may not have been as a result of a complaint.

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    As a citizen of the City of Edmonton, what can I do when I witness an attack towards an attack on someone who is from a marginalized community? Attacks similar to what occurred against five Muslim women in Edmonton in recent days. What can I do to help? What can I do to assist the victim when that suddenly happens?

    JeffCummings asked 7 months ago

    Thank you @jeff for your question. This is a question that we receive often and we have a few tips we can offer.

    • Be aware of your surrounding, try walking in well lit areas with people around you.
    • Have your phone handy- whether to record an incident or to dial for help.
    • If you see suspicious behavior where person(s) or property are at risk call 911. 
    • Avoid approaching the person as it may escalate their behavior or put you at risk.
    • If you can take video or pictures safely, that can later aide police investigations. 
    • If safe to do so, protect / Support a person from being further victimized.
    • Stay with a victim, and try to keep them calm, call for help, and remain with them until police arrive.
    • If possible, make mental notes of the attackers appearance (how they’re dressed, what they look like).

     

    Personal safety is a communal obligation and so I want to thank you for the care that you show. It goes a long way in Keeping our communities safe.

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    Besides volunteering at a soup kitchen how can I be there for homeless people in my community who are the most vulnerable to predatory organized crime businessmen while unemployed out looking for work?

    Frances Bernard asked 7 months ago

    Hi Frances, I want to first thank you for your care and concern for Edmonton's unhoused community. They are some of our city's most vulnerable, and definitely in need of help that addresses their needs while preserving their dignity. I don't have a specific answer for you however, I'd like to highlight a few organizations or resources you can check for opportunities: 

    Homeless Connect Edmontonhttp://www.homelessconnectyeg.com/volunteer 
    Homeward Trust Edmontonhttps://homewardtrust.ca/
    Hope Missionhttps://hopemission.com/edmonton/shelter-housing/
    Boyle Street Serviceshttps://www.boylestreet.org/ 
    Bissel Centrehttps://bissellcentre.org/programs/individual/housing-services/
    Find a Shelter Alberta Gov https://www.alberta.ca/find-shelters.aspx 
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    Access to timely and accurate information is key to any Law Enforcement agencies making sound decisions. With many issues within the community, would the Edmonton Police Service be open to ideas that may improve ongoing issues? If so, who would someone contact regarding that? With the possibility of creating a pilot project that could be modelled across Canada?

    Allubo asked 8 months ago

    Hi @Allubo, Thanks for asking a great questions. One of the goals of the Commitment to Action (and this website) is to engage members of Edmonton's diverse communities. The tools available on this website (Stories, Ideas, and even this Q/A feature) provide opportunities for folks to share their experiences, ideas and feedback. You can also sign up to attend one of our online Zoom sessions with the Chief and share your ideas live. 

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    Will you commit to ending the practice of tent slashing on encampments of people living rough— yes or no? The homeless population is largely indigenous and this is seen by me as an act of intentional racial violence. Not interested in hearing civic housing policy rhetoric. This is a police decision, and this requires a yes or no answer. Thank you.

    Dwayne asked 12 months ago

    When there are issues concerning public safety, EPS officers may be required to remove (not slash) tents. Police officers will work with the City of Edmonton and the occupants first to relocate, however there are times where removal must occur.  These public safety situations may include times where a tent is on or near a roadway, hazardous materials are found in or around the tent, or the tent has been confirmed abandoned. 

    Slashing tents is NOT an approved practice of the Edmonton Police Service . If  you are aware or witness any members of the EPS slashing tents, we encourage you to file a formal complaint. This can be done via our online form on our website for our Professional Standards Branch here: https://www.edmontonpolice.ca/ContactEPS/Concerns.

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    Good afternoon, i am a proud member of Treaty 3 country, i would like to submit my resume for review. I feel this team is extremely important and that i can provide value to the team

    Merle Morrisseau asked 12 months ago
    Thank you so much for your willingness to be part of the team! Our Chiefs Community Council (CCC) will be taking applications starting in the new year. The CCC's mandate is to guide EPS as it implements recommendations that come come from the feedback and advice provided by community members.  

    In the mean time, we welcome you to provide your input through the tools available on this website. You can share a story or suggest ideas by clicking on the corresponding tabs. 

    We will make sure to post an update and send emails  when the CCC recruitment opens up. 

    Best, 

    -Yasin 

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    I would like to attend a listening session to share my experience as a black woman who lives on the south side. Do you plan to have any listening sessions in the Millwoods or south side? 2. If I share my story on line is their a feedback loop to indicate that it’s been received & acknowledged? Thank you

    Jiminez50 asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for reaching out. We are currently working to book listening sessions in all areas of the city, including sessions both South East and South West Edmonton. Please check back over the coming week for more sessions to be added!

    We also welcome you to share your story online. We are carefully reading and learning from every story shared with us. If you do share a story online, you will receive an email response to let you know we have received it. 

    We hope to see you at one of our South side sessions, but encourage you to share through whichever mechanism you feel most comfortable with.

Page last updated: 18 September 2021, 08:54